About Yorkies

Yorkshire Terrier, or “Yorkie” puppies, are irresistibly cute and have the ability to melt your heart into a million tiny pieces. Before you run out to your local Yorkshire Terrier rescue group to bring this adorable pup into your life, there are a few things to know about the breed.

  • They Are Tiny As Puppies And Fragile.

  • Once They Get Older, They Act WAY Bigger Than They Actually Are.

  • Rejoice! Shedding Is (Practically) Non-existent.

  • They Make All Kinds Of Goofy Noises.

General Overview

The Yorkshire Terrier is a small dog breed of terrier type, developed during the 19th century in Yorkshire, England. Ideally its maximum size is 7 pounds (3.2 kg). A popular companion dog, the Yorkshire Terrier has also been part of the development of other breeds, such as the Silky Terrier. It has a grey, black and tan coat, and the breed's nickname is Yorkie.

Coat

For adult Yorkshire Terriers, importance is placed on coat colour, quality and texture. The hair must be glossy, fine, straight and silky. Traditionally the coat is grown out very long and is parted down the middle of the back, but "must never impede movement.

From the back of the neck to the base of the tail, the coat should be a dark grey to a black colour, and the hair on the tail should be a darker black. On the head, high chest and legs, the hair should be a bright, rich tan, darker at the roots than in the middle, that shades into a lighter tan at the tips, but not for all dogs. Also, in adult dogs there should be no black hairs intermingled with any of the tan-coloured fur.

Adult Yorkshire Terriers that have other coat colours than the above, or that have woolly or extra fine coats, are still Yorkshire Terriers. The only difference is that atypical Yorkshire Terriers should not intentionally be bred. In addition, care may be more difficult for "woolly" or "cottony" textured coats, or coats that are overly fine. One of the reasons given for not breeding "off-coloured" Yorkies is that the colour could be a potential indicator of a genetic defect that may affect the dog's health; a careful health screening can clarify if any health risks exist. Coats may vary in colour. For example, a grown Yorkie may have a silver/blue with light brown, while another might have a black and creamy colour.

Puppy coats & Coat care

It may take three or more years for the coat to reach its final colour. The final colour is usually a black or greyish colour. P. H. Combs, writing in 1891, complained about show wins awarded to puppies, when the dog's coat does not fully come in until three or four years old, "and the honor of winning such a prize (for a puppy) can therefore be of but little practical benefit to the owner" since the adult dog's colour cannot be exactly predicted.

Owners may trim the hair short for easier care. For shows, the coat is left long, and may be trimmed to floor length to give ease of movement and a neater appearance. Hair on the feet and the tips of ears can also be trimmed. The traditional long coat is extremely high maintenance. The coat might get knotted if not brushed daily. In order to prevent breakage, the coat may be wrapped in rice paper, tissue paper or plastic, after a light oiling with a coat oil. The oil has to be washed out once a month and the wraps must be fixed periodically during the week to prevent them from sliding down and breaking the hair. Elaborate coat care dates from the earliest days of the breed. In 1878, John Walsh described similar preparations: the coat is "well greased" with coconut oil, the dog is bathed weekly, and the dog's feet are "carefully kept in stockings.

Temperament

The ideal Yorkshire Terrier character or "personality" is described with a "carriage very upright feisty" and "conveying an important air". Though small, the Yorkshire Terrier is active, very overprotective, curious and fond of attention. Mentally sound and emotionally secure ones should normally not show the soft submissive temperament seen in lap dogs although many exhibit this behaviour due to improper training. Because of this, it is advised that a Yorkie would not be suitable for a home with typical young children. Instead, they make ideal companions for older families with many more reputable breeders routinely only homing to families with children older than about 10 years for the comfort of the dog, but more so for the benefit of the child.







Yorkshire Terriers are an easy dog breed to train. This results from their own nature to work without human assistance. They are naturally smart and quick to learn with many being food and or praise motivated. Because they were developed as a working breed many need a lot of both physical and mental stimulation—with both long walks/runs but also indoor games and training to keep their mind busy. They are known for being yappy, but many have reported that a contented Yorkie is a quiet one—that will happily curl up on your knee in the evening. However, they are all individuals, with some being much more laid back than others and the breeder should ideally be able to advise on the needs and temperaments of their particular line. Yorkies are easily adaptable to all surroundings, travel well and make suitable pets for many homes. Due to their small size, they require limited exercise but need daily interaction with people. They thrive on attention and love. Many however are more timid around other dogs and prefer to stay close to their humans for comfort.

Yorkshire Terriers do tend to bark a lot. This makes them excellent watchdogs, as they will sound the alarm when anyone gets close. However, this barking problem can be resolved with proper training and exercise

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